© 2013 Michael Parkatti VVd7313299

Everyone Makes Mistakes: Oilers/Avs Revision

So sometimes the rice paper and hickory holding up my airship springs a leak and I make mistakes.

The overall player Corsi chart from last game had an error, in that it missed the last 7 or so minutes of the third period.  When I originally set it up, I’d only set the formulas to read about 800 rows of a game play by play, thinking it would be impossible for a game to record more events than that.  Most games this year have been between 500 and 700 rows.  The Oilers blew the doors off enough that there were 913 rows :) .  My mistake.

Avv6

So, it turned out better than I had shown the first time.  RNH, Eberle, and now Ladi Smid have set a new season team best with a Corsi of +18.  Taylor Hall ended the night +15, and Jeff Petry +11.

Two Oilers actually did end in negative figures — Ryan Whitney and Eric Belanger both ended at -2.  The rankings didn’t change much for Corsi per minute.

Both my other charts from that post are fine.

To make amends, I created a new chart for you.  Here’s a player vs player matrix for how each Oiler did with every other Oiler, as expressed in even strength shot attempts:

Avv5

Here’s my advice to Ralph Krueger: do not play Ryan Whitney with any Oiler defencemen. Extending that logic suggests not playing Ryan Whitney, if you missed it.  He especially did poor while playing with Eric Belanger and/or Ryan Smyth.  Not sure how it works, but playing the old boys together unlocks some kind of hockey-related Dark Crystal.

One Comment

  1. Scott Mussbacher
    Posted February 19, 2013 at 5:12 pm | #

    Hey Mike,
    I’ve never heard about the Corsi number until reading about it in your blog. I think it’s a pretty strong indicator of an individuals ability to be a positive influence in the game. I like your player vs. player matrix to see how they all line up but it would be interesting to get your take on a player vs player matrix which illustrates a Corsi/min to evaluate the true effectiveness (or ineffectiveness) of line mates. It’s probably a better metric to use later on in the season when there’s been more line combinations but it might be useful in evaluating if a guy like Yakupov contributes more to the effectiveness of Hemsky or Gagner than Hartikainen.
    Thanks for the great reads!

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